Reflections on Judicial Duty

July 20, 2020
The Supreme Court has failed to check the reach of the legislative and executive branches, but I respectfully disagree that it has exceeded its judicial power.
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A Response to Critics

July 20, 2020
Our book is less concerned with interpretive theory than with the grounds of constitutionalism.
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The Variety of Historical Minds

July 20, 2020
Decades past the peak of New Humanism’s renown, this fine volume ably demonstrates that the movement still has much of crucial value to teach us.
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Liberal Dystopia

July 20, 2020
Deneen explicitly links the Framers to the Progressives of the early twentieth century, implying that the two projects were the same and that the Progressives would have met with the Framers’ approval.
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Of Arms and the Men

July 20, 2020
Like modern America, Republican Rome was nearly always at war: between 415 and 265 BC, fewer than 10 percent of its years did not have at least one recorded campaign.
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What Psychology Might Learn from Traditional Christianity

February 14, 2020
Much of modern psychology is based on discoveries made by psychiatrists and psychotherapists while observing their patients. But this is not the first time in history that a large group of professionals has been able to investigate the inner functioning of the human mind.
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The Real Thucydides Trap

September 1, 2018
What we might learn from Thucydides today does not relate only to worries about the rise of China in its new role as Athens. The main lesson comes from Thucydides as an Athenian who reflects on his own city. Graham Allison and American policy makers need to be as self-reflective about America as they are about the rise of China.
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Populism, Elites, and National Security

September 1, 2018
It was an effective myth system that allowed the national security state to operate smoothly in the United States. This was not a “noble lie” on anyone’s part; it wasn’t a lie at all, let alone some grand, “deep state” conspiracy.
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The Neoliberal University and the Neoliberal Curriculum

September 1, 2018
Numerous jeremiads today about American higher education demonstrate a disinclination to examine their subject in a broad historical perspective. Thus many such works seldom cast their purview earlier than the academic culture wars of the 1980s and 1990s, and see these decades as the years that inaugurated the push to treat higher education as a business.
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The Danger of Too Much Safety

September 1, 2018
The authors quote the progressive activist Van Jones giving the perfect response to those who want to maintain a fugitive and cloistered virtue by not listening: "I don’t want you to be safe."
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Encountering the Beautiful

September 1, 2018
James Matthew Wilson wants to overcome the opposition of mythos and logos. This involves going back to Plato, who is often read as setting up this opposition.
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Rawls’s Justification Model for Ethics: What Exactly Does It Justify?

May 16, 2018
Rawls operates with a decision procedure for ethics that keeps corroborating the same moral outlook, a liberal one, whereas the objectivity he claims for the procedure might reasonably have been expected to be consistent with a wider range of moral, social, or political perspectives, or perhaps with a single position equidistant to polar extremes.
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How Desperate Should We Be?

January 2, 2018
Whatever one might think in theory, in practice acting morally is not something like following a blueprint. Guessing and taking risks are often necessary.
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David Hume and the Origin of Modern Rationalism

January 1, 2018
It is true that a moral tradition may contain an error that lasts for centuries, but there is no shortcut. Error must be exposed and corrected by loyal and skillful participants in that very tradition.
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Political Morality Reconsidered: A Rejoinder

January 1, 2018
The cries of righteous indignation that I can hear show the force of ingrained habit. How could universality possibly express itself in particularity? This is surely “relativism,” “solipsism,” “historicism,” “nihilism” “situationism”! This reaction points to the need for rethinking not just morality but epistemology.
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Faith over Love a Formula for Social Atomism

January 7, 2018
The promotion of faith from its traditional subordination to charity led to the virtual destruction of solidarity. Had more Christians lived genuinely Christian lives, things might have been different.
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Radical Son: The Apprenticeship of John Stuart Mill

January 1, 2018
Few parents raise their children from infancy to assume a specific occupation or role in life. Fewer still raise them to be radical reformers. This, however, is precisely what James Mill did with his first-born child, John Stuart Mill.
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Conservatism and Conservation

September 8, 2017
Conservative aversion to environmentalism has contributed to a tendency of many self-identified conservatives to ignore, reject, or simply not involve themselves in real environmental concerns.
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Allan Bloom and Straussian Alienation

July 20, 2020
The reaction of putative conservatives to the publication of Allan Bloom’s The Closing of the American Mind in 1987 was symptomatic of deep intellectual confusion.
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Man: The Lonely Animal

September 8, 2017
In Qatar, my students are perplexed by this fixation American students have about eliminating suffering on a global scale. And they cannot quite escape the suspicion that something more than charity is at work in the minds of the Americans they meet.
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A Humane Economy versus Economism

September 8, 2017
Contributing to the multi-faceted crisis Americans now face is the loss of those values and principles that are essential to a healthy economy.
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Pragmatic Conservatism: A Defense

September 8, 2017
In the “Conclusion” to the fiftieth anniversary issue of Modern Age, “The Decline of American Intellectual Conservatism,” Claes Ryn offers…
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Shylock’s Conversion

September 8, 2017
The thesis of this essay is simply stated: The Merchant of Venice is a Christian play and a comedy that…
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Debt and Sovereignty: The Lost Lessons

September 8, 2017
The national debt is roughly 100 percent of our gross national product, and the people who lend to the federal government are beginning to worry that they will not get their money back. Yet without continuous borrowing, the nation cannot possibly sustain its accustomed lifestyle. Something has got to give.
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[Poem] Lovers

January 3, 2018
Betty, I cried in the night, come closer. I’m chilled to the bone, and my brain is foggy; A kind of numbness steals through every limb.
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Butterfield as Historian: Objectivity Over Partisanship

January 2, 2018
McIntire’s study would have been better had the author provided a stronger historical context, but this deficiency should not obscure the fact that this is an impressive work of scholarly research and textual analysis. Herbert Butterfield is not a typical biography; rather, it is an analysis and explication of the subject’s intellectual achievement.
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Condorcet and the Logic of Technocracy

September 8, 2017
From Edmund Burke and Joseph de Maistre in the eighteenth century through such twentieth-century critics as Lewis Mumford, Karl Popper, and Isaiah Berlin, the utopian concept of a rationally planned or dirigiste society is viewed as one of reason’s most nightmarish monsters.
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Aesop, Aristotle, and Animals: The Role of Fables in Human Life

January 3, 2018
While animals cannot reason, plan for the future, or think through a long-range plan of action, people can and should engage in these actions. Why should we choose to act like animals when we can choose not to and when we can create an environment in which acting like animals is unnecessary?
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Geometries of Force in Homer’s Iliad: Two Readings

January 3, 2018
The idea that war might somehow be mediated by reasonable agreements, heroic values of resistance, and religious scruples, such as those governing the burial of the dead, has been reduced to a shambles by the internal dynamics of war and the logic of violence itself.
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Tradition and Modernity in Postcolonial African Philosophy

January 3, 2018
The relationship between tradition and modernity has been a central theme of postcolonial African philosophy. While African philosophers have examined this theme from many angles, several basic questions have become the focus of ongoing debate and discussion: What is the relevance of indigenous African traditions to the challenges of contemporary life?
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George A. Panichas Conservator Extraordinaire

January 3, 2018
Ultimately, it is this reverence, this humility before God, and this faith in the goodness of life that are at the heart of Panichas’s long and productive career, and that also underlie the sort of conservatism that he has defended so admirably over the course of the past four decades.
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The Hidden Depths in Robert Frost

January 3, 2018
Over a long and accomplished career, Peter J. Stanlis has often worked at the intersection of literature, philosophy, and political philosophy, and this emphasis is evident in Robert Frost: The Poet as Philosopher, a study that explores Frost’s relationship to developments in the sciences, the humanities, and politics from the age of Charles Darwin to the time of John F. Kennedy’s presidency.
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Debacle: The Conservative Movement in Chapter Eleven

September 8, 2017
It should also be stated that, needless to say, the socalled conservative movement has had many admirable features. Some of its members resisted the trends that brought it to its present low point. Unfortunately, as it tries to recover, it may ignore those voices again and repeat its old mistakes.
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Burke’s Historical Morality

September 1, 2017
To say that justice is mutable and that it adapts to meet moral needs specific to historical circumstances is not to imply that justice is arbitrary or historically relative.
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How the Right’s Gone Wrong

September 1, 2017
As in his previous work, Gottfried is critical of the neoconservative project. Gottfried attributes the neoconservatives’ success mostly to their relentless self-promotion and what in the business world is called cross-selling, massive fundraising efforts, and their close ideological (and, in some cases, personal) connections with the liberal establishment.
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Peter Viereck (1916-2006)

January 1, 2018
Peter Viereck was born in New York City in 1916. He died on May 13, 2006, at the age of 89 in South Hadley, Massachusetts, in the same house on the edge of the Mount Holyoke College campus where he and his family had lived since he started teaching at the College.
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Burke’s Higher Romanticism: Politics and the Sublime

September 8, 2017
It is argued here that understanding Burke’s romanticism is an important part of understanding Burke. Understanding Burke’s romanticism also helps one understand the subtle ways in which aesthetics, ethics, and politics interact.
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American Culture: A Story

September 8, 2017
My goal in this essay is less to impart a specific teaching than to tell a story. This story, I first should point out, is not a myth made up for didactic purposes, as so many such stories tend to be.
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Strauss and the Straussians

January 1, 2018
Everything I have seen of the Straussians over the years leads me to the unfortunate conclusion that they are agenda-driven political intellectuals.
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Have We Lost Humility?

January 1, 2018
To examine the role of humility in contemporary society, we must look in unexplored places. The best sellers of our time rarely deal directly with theological or moral issues.
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Kafka’s Afflicted Vision: A Literary-Theological Critique

January 1, 2018
The novel’s aesthetic and interpretive complexity, it will be seen, underlines the multi-layered meaning of salvation itself, in a modern world in which salvation is not necessarily one of divine grace, of deliverance from sin and damnation, in short, of redemption in the hands of an all-powerful God.
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Method and Civic Education

January 1, 2018
1. Introduction Ceux qui, comme porte nostre usage, entreprenent d’une mesme leçon & pareille mesure de conduite, regenter plusieurs esprits…
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Metapolitics Revisited

January 1, 2018
There are now three changed editions of my Metapolitics, with varying subtitles. Written between 1936 and 1941, while the author…
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Roosevelt’s Failure at Yalta

January 1, 2018
The United States Government was fully warned, almost prophetically, by its diplomats who had studied the Soviet Union and understood what recognition entailed.
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Jacob and Esau

September 6, 2017
Esau grew to be a “natural man,” a man of the field and the hunt, an “elder” or more primitive image of humankind, while Jacob grew to be a “smooth” civilized man, a logo-centric man of the tent, or the polis.
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Ethics and the Common Good: Abstract vs. Experiential

January 1, 2018
I shall argue, on the other hand, that Kant is not the final word on personal or political ethics. Indeed, his thought suffers from a fundamental weakness that is retained by both Habermas and Professor Day and, to a lesser degree, by Hayek.
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Edward Rozek: A Student’s Tribute

January 1, 2018
I did not really understand the battles that swirled about us on campus in those days. Yet I learned to discern with my heart the quality of a man’s character and to cleave to what proved true.
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The End of Art Theory

January 1, 2018
In the present age Hegel claims that "the form of art has ceased to be the supreme need of the spirit."
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Irving Babbitt on Lincoln and Unionism

January 1, 2018
Babbitt holds up what he calls “our great unionist tradition” as the crucial “offsetting influence” to all the temptations to which democracies are particularly vulnerable.
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The Heritage of Lincoln

January 1, 2018
Like Gamble and Babbitt himself, I think that the Progressives distorted the historical Lincoln. In my view, however, a careful study of the words and deeds of Lincoln reconfirms Lincoln’s moral and intellectual stature.
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William James and the Moral Will

January 1, 2018
A closer examination shows a thinker not simply dismissive of metaphysics and religion, nor one necessarily hospitable to leftist agendas.
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Deconstruction: Fad or Philosophy?

January 1, 2018
Like other great neologisms—ones we wish we would have thought of but didn’t—deconstruction has suffered the fate of its own ascendancy.
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From ‘Inner Check’ to ‘Bank Check’: Post–Babbitt Literary Criticism

September 5, 2017
I shall concentrate on four themes in Babbitt’s writings that are relevant today to the discipline of comparative literature as well as to related disciplines for which the study of literature may be more important than is generally recognized, whether or not these themes have been reflected in recent critical texts.
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Savior Nation: Woodrow Wilson and the Gospel of Power

January 1, 2018
Sixteen hundred years ago, St. Augustine warned against the inherent idolatry of empire. To assign to one’s earthly nation the mission that by right belongs only to the Kingdom of Christ is to be guilty of the worst of disordered loves.
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Left and Right Eclecticism: Roger Kimball’s Cultural Criticism

January 1, 2018
Mark Lilla held that for Kimball "the cause of the Sixties was quite simply . . . the Sixties. They just happened, as a kind of miracle, or antimiracle—Why did such a profound revolution take place?" In my opinion, Kimball’s reply is not entirely satisfactory.
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A Broader, Subtler View of Power

September 8, 2017
How weak are my putatively weakest points? What about the relevance of “beautiful language,” or female beauty? Are they quite so extraneous to a discussion of political power as Gottfried assumes?
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On Practices

September 7, 2017
Practices are concrete social realities, but they are not natural kinds. Thus, we have to allow, as I do but Frohnen does not, that in a sense we construct or individuate particular practices to suit our purposes.
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On Tradition

November 13, 2017
The ability of traditions to confer legitimacy on social practices helps to explain why cultural nationalists, states, and even radical movements have tried to invigorate their political projects by inventing appropriate traditions, symbols, and rituals.
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A Worthy Kaddish

November 13, 2017
He deliberately sets out to defy Platonic Truth, worshiping the Shadows—the felt, believed, imperfect, flawed perception of touched reality. This—and nothing else—is truth, or at least the only truth that matters.
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A Flawed Defense of the South

November 13, 2017
Charles Adams, a libertarian and prominent historian of taxation, seeks to demolish the “Northern interpretation” of the war, which holds that the conflict was a great moral crusade to preserve democracy.
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Reflections on Past and Present

November 13, 2017
The study of the past always confronts two difficulties. The first is particularism, which exaggerates the difference between past and present. The other is its opposite, anachronism.
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Characterizing Historicist Possibilities: A Reply to Claes Ryn

January 1, 2018
Most importantly, Ryn holds that I place such emphasis on contingency, particularity, and finitude that I have difficulty explaining the basis of the continuity and coherence, weight and responsibility, that I myself find necessary for the reconstructive middle ground.
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History as Synthesis

January 1, 2018
Professor Roberts and I may have not so much a fundamental philosophical disagreement as a difference of philosophical nomenclature and emphasis. Ideas in Roberts’s thinking that are still only tentatively stated could well evolve in ways that will reveal further consonance between us.
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Literary Study and the Social Order

January 5, 2018
The question of the moral and social effects of literary study is so knotty that even people who have made a career of teaching literature sometimes reverse their beliefs concerning the effects of the study of literature upon human conduct.
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An Emblematic American

January 5, 2018
More and more, educated and cultured Europeans recognize Irving Babbitt as an emblem of an almost hidden and all too easily ignored side of American culture.
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The Humbling of the Pride

January 5, 2018
If an ananalytic philosopher has a powerful argument, what difference does it make whether it came from reading Kant or from reading a comic book?
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Antigone’s Flaw

January 4, 2018
Some theorists define politics as who gets what, when and how. Alasdair MacIntyre defines it as "civil war carried on by other means."
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On Wu Mi’s Conservatism

January 4, 2018
Although broad tendencies that may be labeled "conservative" can be traced throughout history, to categorize any group of intellectuals as…
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The Metaphysics of Postmodernism

January 4, 2018
Although most people do not consciously accept postmodernist doctrines, these doctrines may still reflect the working assumptions that most of us live by but refuse to acknowledge.
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Religion and the Constitution

January 4, 2018
This book provides a good example of the distortion of reality, not to mention mind-torturing confusion, that occurs when political documents are viewed through sectarian glasses.
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Defining Historicism

September 8, 2017
The American academy has been abuzz in recent years with a need to identify and get rid of "foundational" thinking. There are, we are told, no suprahistorical essences, no permanent ends, no enduring identities, meanings, or truths.
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Which Liberalism? Which Soul?

September 8, 2017
It may be possible to make Walsh’s hermeneutic inclusiveness work, but there is no evidence it does, and certainly not on the basis of his lavishing of liberal certificates upon a multitude of dead and living thinkers.
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War’s End: A Short Story

September 8, 2017
This story is loosely based on an encounter between the Russian photographer Yevgeny Khaldei and the American photographer Robert Capa, as reported by Michael Specter of the New York Times, in a July 1995 interview.
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[Poem] Gate Talk for Brodsky

January 1, 2018
While trying at age eighty to survive my own recent heart attacks, I'm writing these rhythm-variations of dying for Joseph Brodsky (for, not about, not to), who died of a heart attack January 28, 1996.
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Second Thoughts on Graduate Education

January 1, 2018
My own ideal, already partially fulfilled, is for my work to be made obsolete, of mere historic interest, by the much better achievements of my apprentices. That is the only way I know to surpass my own limitations.
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Forgotten Roots of Individualism

January 1, 2018
The opposition between an individualistic and an anti-individualistic culture is not identical with the opposition between a world-affirming and a world-negating culture.
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Thomas More: Virtuous Statesman

January 1, 2018
Of the statesman's charge, More in Utopia says: "What you cannot turn to the good, you must at least make as little bad as you can."
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Timeless Prescription for the Ills of Our Time

January 1, 2018
Redeeming the Time is a pointed, prescient and at times disturbing collection. It is filled with the sense of "the unbought grace of life" by which Kirk lived his own life, and through which we renew our commitment to the permanent values of our civilization.
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Democratizing the Constitution: The Failure of the Seventeenth Amendment

January 1, 2018
More than twenty years earlier as a Nebraska congressman, "The Great Commoner" had joined the struggle to free the Senate from the control of corrupt state legislatures, and despite three failed campaigns for the presidency, he never wavered in his determination to make the Senate a popularly elected body. 
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God and the Constitution

January 1, 2018
Kramnick and Moore accept that anyone who finds anything positive to say about Christian teaching is a Christian. The architect of the “Jefferson Bible” has as much claim to speak for Christianity as anyone else.
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The Tribalization of the Western Mind

January 1, 2018
Culture has been degraded to somatic gratification, from which all meaning is now derived. Politically, this requires “using threats of high treason to silence doubt” about the status of the body as a justification for reshaping politics.
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[Short Story] The Diorite Whales

January 1, 2018
Jim studied the drop from the bridge to the white caps. Too much time to regret it. A gun would be better. A gun wouldn’t allow for second thoughts like a plunge from the Gate, and a bullet would be more reliable than a fall from a four storey Victorian.
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Babbitt, Literary Positivism, And Neo-Positivism

January 1, 2018
There is another major element in Babbitt’s criticism which has a strong resemblance to the positivist method, even to the original statement of it by Comte. This is the concept of the interrelationship of all knowledge.
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Phony Empathy, Phony Scholarship

January 1, 2018
It was recently reported that a number of colleges, including Emory, Kenyon and the University of Rochester, were encouraging some of their students to experience the conditions of homelessness by sleeping outside on gratings or in cartons.
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Religion and American Liberty

January 1, 2018
Americans fulfilled the promise of their Revolution by establishing the Constitution, its written form intended to enshrine the moral values held by the people based on their religion.
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Another Conception of Knowing

January 1, 2018
Rather than renew a misconceived theory of knowledge, we need to reconstitute the epistemology of the humanities and social sciences along historical-philosophical lines.
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New Dogmas for Old In the American University

January 1, 2018
This book, despite its solid scholarship and publication by a major university press, will be ignored by the author’s own generation of academicians because it truly is radical; that is, it goes to the roots.
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Croce in America: Influence, Misunderstanding, and Neglect

January 1, 2018
The prestige of historical figures rises and falls, and the tendency for the biggest to fall hardest may be especially prevalent in intellectual history. But there seems something anomalous about Croce's case, as René Wellek, the distinguished historian of criticism, recently emphasized.
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The Origin of Modern Society

January 1, 2018
Man is a creature of desires, and since these desires are the products of social and economic motives, good government is situated at the crossroads of individual desires. The focus of politics shifts from moral authority to the social contract.
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[Poem] The Necktie

January 1, 2018
A man intrinsic as the thought If A then B and so on Will tie the hours in a knot,…
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[Poem] Tolerance

January 1, 2018
When those who’d rather undermine than fight Approach with picks and spades to bring you down, To cave the earth…
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Populism vs. Elitism

January 1, 2018
The cultural elite has severed itself from the masses. Elites not only despise what the masses believe, but they feel no obligation to cultivate a relationship with them.
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Republican Virtue and America

January 1, 2018
Virtue is not goodness, but the means toward goodness. This is evident as soon as we ask, “Courage for what?” Understood apart from moral relations virtue seems little more than vainglory, a form of self-flattery, hence self-interest.
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Musings on Postmodern Politics

January 1, 2018
Postmoderns believe that life and politics, both, can be reduced to "problems" and "solutions." They are not only "problem solvers" but "problem finders."
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Allen Tate and The Catholic Revival

January 1, 2018
Yet while the "southern mode of the imagination" in Tate's work has received extensive scrutiny, the Catholic mode of imagination in his writings has been left largely to conjecture.
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Culture and Politics: The American Whig Review, 1845-1852

January 1, 2018
For Whigs, probably more than Democrats, literature and political rhetoric represented similar, closely related instructional devices for both individual and collective improvement. Whig literature was rarely ever for “idle” entertainment only and was almost always didactic.
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The Road Not Taken

January 1, 2018
Which makes it urgent that their wisdom, much of which is summarized in these two books, be heeded.
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Reason’s Revenge on Sociology

January 1, 2018
Having developed into an ideology instead of a study of ideology, sociology amounts to a series of demands for correct politics rather than a set of studies of social culture.
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A Humanist Romanticism?

January 1, 2018
When poets go wrong in this book, which they sometimes do in spectacular ways, they do so for morally comprehensible reasons. Gurney reminds us that Christian virtues can be practiced not only by pagan poets but by readers like ourselves.
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Marxism as Psychodrama

January 1, 2018
Why did Marx so move the world? Did he shed new light on the human story, plumb its mysteries to previously unsounded depths?
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The Political Moralism of Jacques Ellul

January 1, 2018
On the most general level, then, his response to modernity is not unlike many others in the post-War period: a rediscovery of some form of personal moral anchor, in opposition to the surrounding sources of disorder, as a way out of the nihilism of the twentieth century.
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‘The Living Embodiment of the Nation’

January 1, 2018
History, to most of the authors of the Constitution, was more valuable than political theory because it was more real; as Bolingbroke put it, history was philosophy teaching by example.
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A Post-Liberal Thinker

January 1, 2018
Gray’s essential argument is for a regrounding of human social experience in history and nature. If we want to live in a society that is even minimally civilized, there is simply no room for growth without end and ever-more-expansive rights doctrines.
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‘Beyond Presentness’: The Practice of Criticism

January 1, 2018
In Panichas’ view, the critic’s responsibility consists, first, in identifying “the highest things,” and then in articulating how this time-bound aesthetic form can function as a means of transcendent revelation.
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Russell Kirk (1918-94)

January 1, 2018
Russell Kirk had a distinctive, engaging literary style, and he was accessible not just to academic specialists. He was a man of ideas rather than a technical philosopher.
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An Ideal Vital Center?

January 1, 2018
Never does Green allow an early American leader to escape his carping scrutiny. He insists that George Washington was “an unmitigated snob whose personal integrity was protected by his social status at the top of the heap.”
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Céline: Unembellished Man

January 1, 2018
The book’s insights are insights into our century, and what strikes us most is that it is life and not just a marble tribute.
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Elite No Longer

January 1, 2018
Where are the leaders of learning for the twenty-first century? The country waits for its future Harvards and Yales and Stanfords, which led but lead no more.
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No Nice Little Histories

January 1, 2018
Many reviewers appear to have found these two books to be nothing more than nice little histories, refreshing dutch-uncle talks by an aging Kirk to fellow conservatives. They are wrong. Kirk is ever an activist.
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Dostoyevsky and Malthus: Debunkers of Utopianism

January 1, 2018
Then there is the matter of the fixity of human nature and of its separateness from that of the rest of the animal creation, which is also a central assumption, I believe, of all truly conservative thought.
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An Oasis in an Arid Desert

September 5, 2017
Burke never reconciled himself to the French Revolution; but he also held no great hope that the sweeping historical changes that it ushered in could be reversed, at least in the short run.
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Can Virtue Be Taught?

September 2, 2017
There are pleasures too numerous to mention within literature, the fine arts, history, mathematics, science, and philosophy. We cannot say with any assurance, however, that these pleasures will dispose the person to virtue.
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Populism Against Progress

February 1, 2018
Populism, in spite of its possible authoritarian colorations, may be the only force that can meaningfully confront this emergent dystopia.
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Conor Cruise O’Brien’s Burke

September 8, 2017
It is good to see that Burke is being systematically studied. O’Brien gives his reader a broad overview of how Burke pursued his causes in Parliament and in his writing.
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The Incredible Shrinking Historian

September 8, 2017
Theodore S. Hamerow, historian at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, accomplishes with such remarkable wit and acuity the description, analysis, and interpretation of the field of history that we in other fields of the academic humanities gain a model and a message for our own thinking about what we do and how and why we do it.
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An Oasis in an Arid Desert

September 8, 2017
Paul Gottfried, in his revised and expanded edition of The Conservative Movement, expresses a similar short term pessimism about political and cultural developments in the United States.
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[Poem] The Cynic

May 30, 2017
We who worry along paths our ancestors took with surer steps, what is left to us? Is it to lie…
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The Return of John C. Calhoun

January 1, 2018
If his work is treated at all, it is considered part of a sectional defense. Calhoun was concerned, however, with the most fundamental of political issues—the nature of society, the character of the human condition, and the structure of government.
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